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Omm Sety, Memories of Past Life and Love


Omm Sety's personal life story and incredible knowledge of ancient Abydos has intrigued many throughout the world. We can learn so much from her life and her vast knowledge of things long forgotten, lost, or often secreted away....

Dorothy Louise Eady who later came to be known as Omm Sety ('mother of Sety') was born Jan. 16, 1904, in London. At the age of three Dorothy fell down a flight of stairs and after being examined by a doctor she was pronounced dead, only to be found an hour later alive and well playing on her bed. Not long after this, she began having reoccurring dreams of an ancient building with huge columns and a garden filled with fruit, flowers and tall trees. Her parents often found her crying and when they inquired as to why she was crying, she would reply "I want to go home"

Upon a visit to the Egyptian Galleries at the British Museum at age 4, she pulled away from her parents and went running wildly through the exhibits kissing the feet of all the statues. She felt very comfortable and at "home" among the collection. She finally sat down next to a glass mummy case and refused to leave. When they tried to get her to leave she hung onto the case and screamed, "Leave me, these are my people". She had to be removed kicking and screaming.

When she was seven her father brought home a magazine with photos of the Seti I Temple at Abydos. She then realized that this was the building from her reoccurring dreams. She told her father that the Temple was her home and that she had lived there; she said to her father "why it is all broken and where is the garden". When she discovered a photo of the very lifelike mummy of Seti I, she showed it to her father and swore that she really knew this man....

Then at ten years old she began cutting school and going to the Egyptian Galleries at the British Museum. One day the Keeper of Egyptian and Assyrian Antiquities, Sir E. A. Wallis Budge, noticed her there and asked why she was not in school. She replied that school did not teach her what she wanted to learn. "And what might that be?" he asked. "Hieroglyphs!" she replied. This was the beginning of many years of friendship and tutorage. Budge was amazed at how rapidly and easily Dorothy learned and translated hundreds of Hieroglyphs. Years later Budge asked her why she had wanted to learn to read hieroglyphs and she replied, "oh, I didn't want to learn to read them, I needed to remember them".

As a teenager she had her first visit from Seti I, he appeared in his mummy wrappings. It was at this time that she began having more detailed dreams of her past life in Ancient Egypt.... She was not to see Seti again for 15 years and this time he appeared as he had looked while alive but not fully materialized.

When she was twenty-seven years old, she met her future husband, Imam Abdel Meguid. Imam was in London studying to be a teacher, he returned to Cairo and she followed shortly after. Dorothy had a son from her marriage, whom she named Sety. This is how she came to be known as Omm Sety (Mother of Sety) it was an Egyptian custom to not refer to a woman by their first name, but by the name of their eldest child. Her marriage ended in divorce within a few years.

While living in Cairo, she became the first woman to work for the Egyptian Antiquities Department. Beginning in 1936 she began working with the distinguished Egyptologist Professor Selim Hassan on the Giza Plateau. Being an excellent artist she copied and cataloged many of the artifacts for Prof. Hassan. Eventually she edited and provided the drawings as well as acted as a ghost writer for much of his 10 volume series ‘Excavations at Giza’. She spent nearly 20 years living near and working on the Giza Plateau with some of the pioneering giants of Egyptology.

Years later, in 1956 she finally returned 'home' to Abydos, where she remained till her death in 1981....

The temple at Abydos was commissioned by Seti I in the 19th Dynasty. Omm Sety was deeply devoted to the temple. She would remove her shoes before entering and kept to the ancient ways of worship. She placed the offerings and performed the necessary rituals and ceremonies. She also celebrated the ancient holidays and festivals.

From Omm Sety's diaries, and many hours of recordings of conversations with her dear friend Hanny El Zeini, we learn that Omm Sety's past life was as a priestess of Isis. Her name was Bentreshyt (Harp of joy) and her duty was to play the role of Isis in 'The Mystery Plays'. The play was the story of the life, death and resurrection of the Egyptian god Osiris, held at Abydos. She also confided that Seti I had fallen in love with her after a chance meeting in the Temple gardens when she was a young priestess there. She told of her love affair with Seti in this lifetime as well, four years of which they engaged in physical intimacy....Although Seti continued to visit her till the end of her life, the physical relationship ended upon her return to Abydos. It had been decreed that she must make restitution and live out the remainder of her life chaste, fulfilling her past life’s duties as a temple virgin.

Omm Sety had a profound knowledge of all things Egyptian, she became an extremely popular and respected figure at Abydos, giving tours of the temple, writing papers, piecing together and cataloging thousands of fragments of text from the temple, and even curing the local villagers who came to her knowing she knew the secrets of ancient Egyptian magic and healing. Many of these cures including a few of her own recoveries from illness were a result of her use of water from the Osirion.

The most amazing part of Omm Sety's abilities was the archaeological discoveries at Abydos which were from memories of her time there, more than three thousand years earlier....Omm Sety was able to show where the garden had once existed at the temple. She pointed out the exact spot in which to dig, This is the same garden she had met Seti in, during her past life. She also knew precisely where to dig to find the tree roots of the trees that once stood in the garden....

Omm Sety's detailed knowledge of Egyptology and ancient Egyptian magical and spiritual practices was admired by all who met her, including some of the greatest Egyptologists in the field, with whom she knew and worked with in Cairo and at Abydos. Most researchers agree it would have been impossible for her to obtain such a profound knowledge and understanding of ancient Egypt through the normal academic channels of learning. More so, they were dumbfounded by her ability to locate the ruins of villages, temples, tombs, boat pits, secret tunnels and many other things that had it not been for her they would still be buried under the sands of time....

"In ancient times the Egyptians placed great importance on a person's name or "ren". It was thought of as a living part of each individual, much like the ka and other aspects of the body. Great care was taken to ensure one's name would not be forgotten, and as long as it was remembered, the deceased was believed to be immortal. It is our desire to ensure that Omm Sety's name and legacy will always be remembered."

© Copyright 2006 by Melissa Riley

Resources:
My Dear friend, Dr. Hanny El Zeini
'Omm Sety's Egypt' By Hanny El Zeini and Catherine Dees, 2006....
' The Search for Omm Sety' by Jonathan Cott and Hanny El Zeini, 1987....
' Abydos, Holy City of Ancient Egypt' by Omm Sety and Hanny El Zeini, 1981....
' Omm Sety's Abydos' By Dorothy Louise Eady (Omm Sety) Society for the Study of Egyptian Antiquities Publications 1983.....
' Photo credit, Lynn Harvey, www.anthemion.com....



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